FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Monsoon woes
Posted:Jul 2, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Days after the monsoon started some deaths and devastation has been left behind by floods and landslides. The rainy season is to stay here about three months, and the high monsoon period is yet to arrive. Given the generally poor condition of the roads across the country, including the much used Prithvi Highway, which links the capital city with the Tarai and other parts of the country along the way, traversing most of them has been made more difficult by the rains. When the mountains and hills get rain, floods sweep down, causing havoc along the way, including the country’s plains. With the monsoon intensifying, the threat of floods and landslides is looming larger over the country. Several people have already lost their lives in floods and landslides very recently.
 
Floods and landslides are natural disasters, but they have been more frequent and deadlier because of man’s increasing encroachment on nature and violations of its laws. There has not been foolproof protection against the fury of heavy rain, and resulting floods and landslides. Even the most advanced countries in the world are not totally safe from it, but they have taken enough protective measures to minimize the toll of death and devastation. Nepal has fallen far behind. Heavy rain, flood and landslides take their annual high tolls in a country where dry landslides have started striking with greater frequency as the holding capacity of soil has been weakened by human encroachment and the major earthquakes of 2015. But all this should not serve as a cover for the lack of seriousness of successive governments in building strong protections against the havoc that may be created by floods and landslides. A number of measures should be taken, such as the construction of adequate embankments on vulnerable sections of rivers and streams and along the hilly roads, the installation of effective flood warning systems, encouraging development of cluster settlements in hilly and mountainous regions, avoiding construction of houses on vulnerable spots, and encouraging further afforestation to strengthening the holding capacity of soil.
 
Nepal is chiefly a mountainous country dotted with many glacial lakes. Climate change has affected the behavior of floods, landslides and glacial lakes in the country, which necessitates further measures to minimize the risks they pose. A recent study conducted by an American professor has found at least 11 lakes at very high risk and 31 at high risk, and it concludes that there must be a strong and effective coordination between the scientific community and the local residents to provide the locals with better information on risk, hazards and other possible consequences of glacial lake outburst floods. The role of the government is more important as it can set things moving to take the recommended science-based and community-driven approaches to the minimization of these risks which, when they become a reality, could cause widespread damage. All sources of these hazards should be taken into consideration. But willpower of those who can make real change in this respect, those in positions of power, is more important than anything else. But herein lies the main problem.
 
Keep it up
 
There are numerous cases of patients being abandoned at Bir Hospital. There are some helpers who take care of such patients, but they have so far failed to get recognition for the good work they are doing. Many of these helpers put their life at risk by caring for those with highly contagious diseases like Hepatitis B  and HIV/AIDS. Most of the patients are left to fend for themselves by their families. According to the records available as many as three to four patients are abandoned at the emergency ward every day. The hospital has facilities for such abandoned patients with two beds being allocated for them. However, some patients stay in these wards for more than a week.
 
As such, it is essential to have more beds to cater for the patients who are abandoned. Those patients abandoned by their near and dear ones come mostly from impoverished families in the rural areas in particular who also happen to be uneducated. Such patients can be seen staying on the passageways as they do not find enough space. Thus, there should be more helpers and these social workers need accolades for the wonderful work they are doing.
 
The Himalayan Times, July 3, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
A top Chinese Army official on Sunday said negotiations with the Indian Army paved the way for the resolution of the Doklam stand-off on the India-China border.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
As about-turns in the three-year-old BJP government go, this must be among the shortest and most important tweets issued by any BJP leader. And although Prime Minister Modi spent Diwali with soldiers in Gurez less than a week ago, it was left to Home minister Rajnath Singh to announce a major policy shift on Jammu & Kashmir at 4 pm
 
read-more
  In his report at the opening of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, Xi Jinping redefined the principal contradiction facing Chinese society in the new era, namely between unbalanced, inadequate development and the people's ever-growing needs for a better life. Providing this better life has become
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In snap polls in Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party-led coalition has secured a two-thirds majority in the lower house of parliament.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive