FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Need more tertiary education institutions
Posted:Oct 11, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Education has always received priority in our country and rightly it’s credited for transforming Bhutan to its current state of development. The recent inauguration of new education institutions reminds us of the acute shortages of such institutions at the tertiary level in the country.
 
The staggering number of university graduates that enter the job market annually triggers one to think from where all these graduates come while our own institutions are limited in numbers. Yes, a majority of them are graduating from abroad – some on scholarships availed from the government while others on private funding.
 
According to Annual Education Statistics 2016 report, there are 11,383 students pursuing various courses in all tertiary institutions in Bhutan. While a majority of students under RUB (with the exception of RTC) are funded by the RGoB, about 1,650 (14.5 percent) are self-financed. It’s estimated that there are 3,985 tertiary students, of which 867 are scholarships students and 2,924 under private funding, are studying abroad as of 2016.
 
For certain specialised courses, we would continue to rely on institutions abroad. But it’s about time we explore and develop in-country capacity for many of the other courses. Not all parents are gifted with children of high academic caliber and at the same time, many of them fall in a category of above average but missing the merit based open scholarships.
 
These parents would be more than happy to incur equivalent expenditure, of sending them abroad, and send their children to a college at home rather than face all the uncertainties and worries of studying outside. The long distance, political upheavals, sudden change in policies of the universities, and casualness and leniency of education in some colleges, often put serious doubt on the quality of academic degrees acquired abroad.
 
In view of resource constraints faced by the government, perhaps, it is an opportune time to capitalise on the Public Private Partnership (PPP) model in the development of some more tertiary education institutions in the country. The PPP rules and regulations 2017, which was drafted in line with the PPP policy 2016, launched recently by the government could be effectively utilised for the education sector.
 
In 2009, our Druk Gyalpo, in His Address at the 3rd convocation of the Royal University of Bhutan, said:
 
“Our education system built and nurtured with your hard work and dedication has served us well. But we must understand that the times have changed here in Bhutan and all around us in the world. We cannot face new challenges with the same tools.”
 
It’s about time we harnessed private, including external, resources to develop educational institutions for relevant courses in the country and maximise the number of Bhutanese educated at home with quality.
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Chief of General Staff, United Kingdom, Gen Sir Nicholas Carter’s, visit to India in mid-February was covered by Defence Ministry releasing five photographs and not a word on his engagements/itinerary, writes Anil Bhat
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
The largest military exercises in Southeast Asia concluded on February 23 in Thailand, after 11 days of drills, social and humanitarian projects and traditional jungle training. A total of 11,075 soldiers from 29 countries participated in the Cobra Gold 2018 training, held in eastern Thailand, reports Efe news.
 
read-more
Maldives President Abdulla Yameen “conveyed that mediation was not wanted at this stage” when UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres spoke to him last week, Guterres's spokesperson Stephane Dujrric confirmed Thursday, writes Arul Louis
 
read-more
Srinivasan leaves his office in Bengaluru where the lights and air-conditioners are switched off when sensors planted inside notice that he is leaving. He is prompted on his e-watch as to how much time it would take for the elevator to arrive on his floor, based on movement-recognition, writes Rajendra Shende
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more

Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre held a lecture in the “China's Belt and Road Initiative: Nature, Implications and India's Response”

 
read-more
Column-image

What is history? How does a land become a homeland? How are cultural identities formed? The Making of Early Kashmir explores these questions in relation to the birth of Kashmir and the discursive and material practices that shaped it up to the ...

 
Column-image

A group of teenagers in a Karachi high school puts on a production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible— and one goes missing. The incident sets off ripples through their already fraught education in lust and witches, and over the years ...

 
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...