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No coexistence with violence
Posted:May 23, 2017
 
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It is a fundamental right of every nation, including Muslim countries that its boys and girls should be able to grow up free from fear, safe from violence, and innocent of hatred. But, the problem is that war in the Muslim community has taken this right from its citizens. There is killing ever day, and wounding is a matter of moment. In the states-quo some Arab countries are in the worst situation, taking the lives of people on daily basis. In Afghanistan-if situation is not the same, but there is no peace and stability. Civilian casualty is high. Children are bearing the brunt of casualty at highest level. Indeed, it is a great concern. Afghanistan is a sovereign nation—there is no doubt on it. The priority of the government is to provide safety and security to the citizens—to do that the government needs to have partnership with other countries based on shared interest and values to purse a better future for the Afghan people.
 
 But it is heart-wrenching when to see some countries, which are powerful in term of military, remained silent, and not adopting practical efforts to end war in the Islamic countries through several channels. To build more sold, and effective security partnerships to counter, and prevent the rising threats of terrorism, and violent extremis in the world through promoting tolerance, and moderation, the Arab Islamic American Summit held in the Saudi Arabian capital, Riyadh with 55 leaders and representatives from 60 Islamic countries, including Afghanistan in attendance—including visiting US President Donald Trump. The main question is that will this summit mark a beginning of the end of terror practice in the Middle East, and in Afghanistan. 
 
It is a widely believe that all countries involved in the issue are taking advantage of the war and they can’t reach to their goals without fighting the war. The war-hit and poorer countries are at the backfire. Certainly, peaceful future can only be achieved through defeating terrorism and the ideology that drives it, whether it is in Afghanistan or in Syria, Iraq and other countries. In war against terror we must seek partners, not perfection, and make an ally that believes in fighting insurgency honestly. In his speech during the summit, President Trump, said, “If we do not act against this organized terror, then we know what will happen. Terrorism’s devastation of life will continue to spread. Peaceful societies will become engulfed by violence. And the futures of many generations will be sadly squandered.” Moreover, he praised the Afghan security forces, saying “courageous Afghan soldiers are making tremendous sacrifices in the fight against the Taliban, and others, in the fight for their country.”
 
 However, Trump’s speech doesn’t match with action. Since US is in direct war against insurgents in Afghanistan, but still there is no peace. US is a powerful country, and can eliminate Taliban and other militant outfits within weeks. But to do that intention is required, which US at somehow doesn’t has. It is a clear fact that insurgents have growth as a result of a wrong policy of US toward elimination of their (militants) hideouts outside Afghanistan. Militants funding and training grounds have to be removed, and US could play key role in it. Trump believes in peace, he said, but the prolong war in Afghanistan has to be ended if he favoring peace. Trump has to deliver his words into action, and take a bold step in elimination of terrorists, function in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and other countries. Supporting and providing stat-of-the-art weaponries to the Afghan security forces, which already President Trump lauded them for their sacrifices, can be taken as one step forward to purge terrorists.
 
Afghanistan Times, May 23, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
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