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Paradoxical polices
Posted:Aug 6, 2017
 
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The US National Security Adviser Gen. H.R McMaster said that President Donald Trump wants Pakistan to change its paradoxical policy of supporting the militants who are causing the country great losses. He also defended President Trump’s strategy on winning the war in Afghanistan by giving unrestricted powers to the US military based in the war-torn country. 
 
US officials have often accused Pakistan of helping the militants, but this marks the first time that the allegation has been attributed to President Trump. Such statement giving hope to the Afghan masses that have been rendering huge scarifies in the fight against insurgency. The core reason behind instability in Afghanistan that caused numerous deaths to Afghan and foreign forces beside civilians, is escalation of war by militant outfits that enjoys covert and overt supports by Pakistan. 
 
Islamabad has been supporting and harboring militancy in a bid to undermine US mission in Afghanistan. US could have win war in shortest time, if the militants were not receiving supports by Pakistan. “The President (Trump) has also made clear that we need to see a change in behavior of those in the region, which included those who are providing safe haven and support bases for the Taliban, Haqqani Network and others,” Mr. McMaster said. At the same time, it is better for US not to remain in statements only. Action has to be taken in this regard. Once these statements translated into action, US not only win Afghan war, but also prove that they are honest to purge insurgent groups—something that many people have doubt on. 
 
There are widely believes among several Afghans from politicians to commoners that US is not willing to end war in Afghanistan. Maybe it is in the interest of US to prolong the war. Anyways, Trump administration is seems straightforward and committed to end the war. However time will prove. But recent call on Pakistan to shun support militant outfits at somehow produce hope that US through pressurizing Pakistan—the godfather of militants, really willing to win war. Without doubt, insurgents will not last 24 hours sans Pakistan’s support. It would not be exaggeration to say that US, the world’s superpower country, can’t win war if further slipshod made toward Pakistan’s paradoxical policy that always changes side like coin. US have to kill the disease instead of the patient. 
 
In these days, US is engaged in crafting a new winning strategy for Afghanistan, and it’s winnable as US now talking to Pakistan in a language the country understands. Cutting funds is another great move. A senior ex-Pakistani official recently said that the country is making money by wagging war in Afghanistan. By killing of insurgent leaders, now there is enough evidence to trigger Pakistan to the court for its brutality against Afghan people, also for its treachery with international community, especially to the US in the global campaign of war on terror. Pakistan is criminal and has to be brought to the book.
 
Afghanistan Times, August 7, 2017
 
 
 
 
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