FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Reform public service delivery
Posted:Jan 3, 2018
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Reforms in public service delivery have received considerable attention over the past years. With technology as a key enabler, the government past and the incumbent has made attempts to improve public service delivery.
 
But these efforts continue to fall short, to the extent that the competency of the organisation that has the mandate to deliver a particular service is questioned.
 
On January 1, Thimphu residents who had gone to the Motithang fuel depot early on to avail LPG cylinders were in for a shock. Their LPG card was not accepted anymore because the trade office’s online services for POL products came into effect that day. This means, kerosene coupon, new gas connection and refilling of LPG cylinders were to be availed online by downloading the POL mCoupon App.
 
Customers were taken aback when they were asked for the e-coupon number. Those who carried smartphones were able to download the App but weren’t able to process their request. Those who didn’t carry smartphones panicked. A ruckus ensued and after much request to the depot staff to accept the card they had issued earlier, some were able to return home with refilled LPG cylinders.
 
This happened because the economic affairs ministry and the regional trade office failed to inform the people early on of the change in availing POL products. A public notification was posted on the ministry’s website but it was issued the day the online service went live. It was wrong of the ministry and its dealing agency to assume that all residents in Thimphu carry a smartphone. It is inexcusable that it failed to create awareness and to inform the public about the change in availing public services.  It matters little that the residents’ struggle for basic services unfolded within walking distance from the ministers’ enclave.
 
Our policy makers need no reminder that central to the demand for better public services are the expectations of citizens. This means the citizens’ needs must be at the core of every decision, from strategy to design to execution. The way POL products are dispensed to consumers today shows the incapability of those agencies that are tasked with the responsibility to deliver public services. The agencies must know that they are not doing the citizens a favour by being efficient.  It is their responsibility to be so.
 
We see weak accountability as one of the factors responsible for poor service delivery. Policy makers and economic affairs ministry must initiate reforms and transform the way the trade department functions. Agencies that have the mandate to deliver public service have to change the way they think and act and assess their roles in a changing Bhutan.
 
The government recently launched eKaaSel for people to express their dissatisfaction, problems, and provide feedback related to public services offered in the country.  But it is hoped that the government doesn’t wait for a citizen to lodge a complaint online for it to react. Redressing public grievances should not be for political stunts.
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Thailand will be the coordinating country for India within ASEAN from July. In an exclusive interview with INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS, the fortnightly journal of the Society for Policy Studies (SPS),  Thailand’s Ambassador to India, Chutintorn Gongsakdi, gave a comprehensive view of bilateral relations and
 
read-more
The struggle for autonomy has been going on within the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) from their inception, writes P.D. Rai
 
read-more
As India and the 10-nation ASEAN bloc culminate the commemoration of 25 years of their dialogue partnership with a summit in New Delhi January 25 that all the leaders will attend, India is laying out the crimson carpet to ensure that the first ever Republic Day celebrations at which 10 ASEAN leaders will be Chief Guests, jointly, is a
 
read-more
The United Nations Security Council concluded a fact-finding mission to Afghanistan in a show of support for the war-torn nation where it denounced the activities of terrorists there, the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) announced Monday.
 
read-more
While appreciating the remarkable turnaround by Indian exports during November 2017, Anil Khaitan, President, PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry said that India has seen a major breakthrough in its exports to China during last few months whereas the surge in imports for Chinese products in Indian market is on deceleration.
 
read-more
“We have a very solid commitment to climate action,” he said. “We cannot be defeated by climate change and we are not yet winning this battle” and the biggest victims of climate change are the developing countries that are members of the Group of 77 (G77).
 
read-more
In a bid to promote trilateral innovation and business opportunities between the US, India, and Israel, Israel-India Technology Group has launched a trilateral fund of $50 million. "We ar...
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: Salafi-Jihadism -The History of an Idea; Author: Shiraz Maher; Publisher: Penguin Random House UK: Pages: 292; Price: Rs 499

 
Column-image

A Review of Anatomy of Failure by Harlan K. Ullman (Naval Institute Press, 242 pages)

 
Column-image

Title: The Beckoning Isle; Author: Abhay Narayan Sapru; Publisher: Wisdom Tree; Pages: 157; Price: Rs 245

 
Column-image

Title: India Now And In Transition; Editor: Atul Thakur ; Publisher: Niyogi Books: Pages: 448; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

Title: The Power Paradox; Author: Dacher Keltner; Publisher: Penguin Random House UK: Pages: 208; Price: Rs 499