FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Relief finally
Posted:Aug 1, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
In the area of compensation or relief at least, Nepali migrant workers have received a little sense of security in case of serious injuries sustained or losing lives while working overseas. In the latest amendment to the Foreign Employment Regulations, several improvements have been made. One makes even those migrant workers who become critically ill eligible to claim compensation. The amount of compensation has also been raised from the earlier three lakh rupees to seven lakh rupees, which is more than double the earlier sum of compensation. Because of the harsh working conditions for most workers in many Nepali labour destination countries, particularly the Gulf countries and Malaysia, a significant number of workers die, get critically ill or are seriously injured. The compensation will give significant relief to the hapless family members of the victims of the above-mentioned circumstances.
 
A further provision is that the migrant workers will be eligible for the full welfare benefit for one year over and above the initial period of their labour contracts. Migrant workers with a valid labour contract will also get the full welfare benefit even if they do not happen to be at their labour destination when the fatalities occur. The government will utilize the Foreign Employment Welfare Fund, which has been sharply increased now as per a June 2 Cabinet decision, also to rescue the Nepali migrant workers stranded abroad and to get migrant workers imprisoned in destination countries to be released by appointing lawyers to plead their cases. On their part, each migrant worker in the Gulf countries and Malaysia with a maximum of a three-year work permit has to contribute Rs. 1,500 to the Welfare Fund, Rs 500 more than earlier. As for workers with more than a three-year contract heading for South Korea and Israel, they will pay Rs. 2,500 to the Fund.
 
The benefits that accrue will justify the small contribution each worker has to make. Besides, migrant workers are also required to buy a life insurance policy of Rs.1.5 million and an insurance cover of five lakh rupees against critical illness before they can go overseas to work. Accidents and fatalities are not good things, but they cannot be totally prevented. The welfare benefits for the hapless victims or their families will provide some succor in times of great financial need. Here, two things are important. The government should see to it that the Fund is not used to pay for other unnecessary or unjustified expenses; second, all the provisions of the Regulations must be fully carried out, and there should not be any hassles for the kin of the victims to get the compensation or other benefits from the welfare scheme. The Fund, set up a decade ago, has reached Rs. 4 billion now. Over the years, criticism has come from various quarters that a lot of money was spent out of the Fund to pay for junkets and other expenses of powerful people, like ministers and bureaucrats. The government must not give any opportunity for such criticism to anybody because the Fund exists only to benefit the Nepali migrant workers working overseas, not for any other purposes.
 
Raise awareness
 
The 25th World Breastfeeding Week is being observed from Monday. This year the theme for the week is appropriately “Sustaining Breastfeeding Together”. There is much to be gained from breastfeeding. The new born gains immunity from the mother’s milk. This also has much impact on maternal and child health. Breastfeeding is necessary for all lactating mothers. Also those involved and affected are family members, communities as well as health workers. Unfortunately, due to lack of awareness many women are found to be avoiding breastfeeding which is unhealthy. Various programmes are to be held for this week by the Ministry of Health and Population to raise awareness and also do away with misconceptions that is associated with breastfeeding and mothers are reluctant to breastfeed their babies.
 
Breastfeeding babies within one hour after being born is considered to be a healthy practice. If this is done then thousands of deaths of the newly born could be avoided. Only 55 per cent women breastfeed their babies within an hour of birth. Although we have succeeded in controlling maternal and child mortality we are still far behind to prevent the untimely death of many children. Therefore, the practice of breastfeeding should be encouraged.
 
The Himalayan Times, August 2, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has confirmed his presence for the occasion. In an exclusive interview with INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS, Indonesia’s Ambassador to India, Sidharto R.Suryodipuro, reminded Nilova Roy Chaudhury that the first Chief Guest for India’s Republic Day celebrations, in 1950, w
 
read-more
The words of Ho Chi Minh  “Nothing is more precious than independence and liberty” rang true for the people of the erstwhile East Pakistan when, with increasing brutality, the West Pakistani oppression spread across the land, writes Anwar A Khan from Dhaka
 
read-more
In a significant boost to New Delhi's Act East Policy, India and Japan set up the Act East Forum on Tuesday as agreed during Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to India this year for the annual bilateral meeting that would help to focus and catalyse development in India's Northeast.
 
read-more
During an awards ceremony honouring six serving and former diplomats and international civil servants for their contributions to world peace and development, the UN was hailed as an institution embodying the Diwali spirit of good overcoming evil. Among those who received the award was Assistant Secretary-General Lakshmi Puri, who is al
 
read-more
When a rising power challenges an incumbent one, war often follows. That prospect, known as the Thucydides trap after the Greek historian who first described it, looms over relations between China and the West, particularly America. So, increasingly, does a more insidious confrontation. Even if China does not seek to conquer foreign la
 
read-more
The first thing that one sees when a flight approaches New Delhi is thick smog that envelopes the city and its lack of greenery.  In almost all other major cities of India lack of greenery is the most obvious sight that one sees when approaching it by air.
 
read-more

Pakistan has agreed to allow the rupee to depreciate after holding talks with the International Mone­tary Fund (IMF) on the country's economy.

 
read-more

Two major global changes in the past year; the ‘Brexit’ referendum and the advent of Donald Trump, writes Sandeep Kaur Bhatia

 
read-more

It is also imperative for India to explore other regions for markets. Its trade deficit with Latin America has been narrowing. Also, its trade with Mexico, Colombia and Guatemala has increased, ...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: A Ticket to Syria; Author: Shirish Thorat; Publisher: Bloomsbury India: Pages: 254; Price: Rs 399

 
Column-image

Gorichen, a majestic peak in the Eastern Himalayas at an altitude of 22,500 feet, is the highest in Arunachal Pradesh. Beautiful to look at and providing a fantastic view from the top, it is extremely tough climb for mountaineers.

 
Column-image

It is often conjectured if the reason for long-standing conflicts and insurgencies, in the developing world, especially South Asia, is not only other powers fishing in troubled waters but also the keenness of arms industries, mostly Western, to...

 
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...