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Student politics
Posted:Mar 10, 2017
 
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THE turmoil in the student world in India since January 2016 provides a grim warning of the dangers posed to democracy when students fall prey to extremist politics and resort to violence to silence dissent.
In January last year, Dalit scholar Rohith Vemula committed suicide after he was suspended by the Hyderabad University. Najeeb Ahmed, a student at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, disappeared after clashes with persons from the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad. Since most of the recent troubles are due to the ABVP’s kind of politics, one must know its background.
The ABVP was set up in July 1948 by Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) activists to escape the ban imposed on it after Gandhi’s assassination. Its founder, Balraj Madhok, was a rabid politician who became president of BJP ancestor Jan Sangh. Its aim was to combat leftist student groups.
 
It was involved in the 1951 communal riots in Jabalpur and in clashes with Shiv Sena in Mumbai. Its present agenda is to prevent any meeting or seminar that had invited persons opposed to the BJP line. Film screenings or demonstrations to express dissent from the RSS-BJP line meet the same fate. The technique is uniformly deployed — object to an event on the campus; ask the college authorities to ban it; failing that, ask BJP ministers to use their clout to arrest its ideological foes and, meanwhile, create an incident to justify attacks on the organisers of the event by ABVP goons.
 
Read more at: https://www.dawn.com/news/1319658/student-politics
 
Dawn, March 11, 2017 
 
 
 
 
 
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