FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Sustainable development is the answer to a better future
Posted:Jul 13, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
By Sudip Bhattacharyya
 
Sustainability in the production process means that which can sustain itself and not self-destruct. In the social context it means acting in the best interest of future generations – with respect to the economy, the environment and society.
 
Sustainable development recognizes that growth must be both inclusive and environmentally sound to reduce poverty and build shared prosperity for today’s population and to continue to meet the needs of future generations without depleting natural resources and endangering the future. It must be efficient with resources and carefully planned to deliver immediate and long-term benefits for people, planet, and prosperity.
 
Demographic change, rising expectations, urbanization, and globalization are affecting and defining lives and economies throughout the world. These game-changing forces are shaping our business by creating new markets and opening up new opportunities. 
 
Over the last two decades, economic growth has lifted more than 660 million people out of poverty in India and has raised income levels of millions more, but too often it has come at the expense of the environment and the poor and vulnerable communities. 
 
There have been a variety of market, policy, and institutional failures, due to which Earth’s natural capital has been used in ways that are economically inefficient and wasteful, without sufficient reckoning of the true costs of resource depletion. While the burning of fossil fuels supported rapid growth for decades, it set forth dangerous consequences; climate change today has reached a point that it is threatening to roll back decades of the development process.
 
Simultaneously, growth patterns have left hundreds of millions of people behind: 1.2 billion in India still lack access to electricity, 870 million are malnourished, and 780 million are still without access to clean, safe drinking water. And in many instances, it has destroyed the traditional means of livelihood.
 
The three pillars of sustainable development – economic growth, environmental stewardship, and social inclusion – carry across all sectors of development. Cities are embracing low-carbon growth and public transportation. Farmers are picking up practices of climate-smart agriculture. Countries are recognizing the value of their natural resources, and industries are realizing how much they can save through energy and supply chain efficiency. 
 
Education and value systems, health, energy efficiency and water are the main sustaining force for society. Government of India plans to rank states on the basis of their performance in education—from the quality of their school infrastructure to learning outcomes. A value system that supports and imparts consciousness and concern for areas of sustainable development must be developed and incorporated in curriculum. The idea of ranking is to instil a spirit of competition among states. It is also doing similar exercise for energy efficiency and, hopefully, will do for water conservation and the health sector. 
 
UNDP has identified 17 goals /areas to be managed for sustainable development. These are: no poverty, zero hunger, good health and well-being, quality education, gender equality, clean water and sanitation, affordable and clean energy, decent work and reduced inequality, sustainable cities and communities, responsible consumption and production, climate action, life below water, life on land, peace, justice and strong institutions and partnership for the goals. In working towards these goals, the consensus of all participants in society is required to define objectives and implement them: private and public sector companies, associations, NGOs, unions, and citizens.
 
The principal objective of sustainable development is to define viable schemes combining the economic, social, and environmental aspects of human activity. These three areas must therefore be taken into consideration by communities, companies, and individuals in India and South Asia. The ultimate aim of sustainable development is to find a coherent and long-lasting balance between these three aspects.
 
Finally, in defining viable schemes and this balance, new technologies in marine resources, space, energy efficiency, material science and other evolving areas will facilitate their enhancement, to a great extent.
 
(The writer is a commentator on contemporary issues. He can be contacted at bhattacharyya.s@gmail.com)
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
read-more
Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
read-more
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.