FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
This is not the India we fought for, say its freedom fighters on I-Day
Updated:Aug 15, 2011
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

New Delhi, August 14: As India marches into its 65th year of independence, the people who fought tooth and nail for the freedom most of us take for granted feel this is not the nation of their dreams and are troubled by the all-pervading culture of corruption.

Captain S.S. Yadav, a 93-year-old freedom fighter who served in the Indian National Army (INA) of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose, feels that the country has progressed a lot in the last six decades, but corruption too has increased exponentially.

"Corruption has bugged our administrative system badly and I really feel ashamed when youngsters ask me if we fought for the freedom to provide them a corrupt system," Yadav told IANS.

So what does independence mean to him? He responds promptly: "It means an opportunity to work selflessly for the nation and serve its people. But where is that seen today? Today no one can get their work done without bribery."

Octogenarian Pratima Kaushik, who spent two months imprisoned along with her two brothers in Lahore, fondly remembers moments spent in jail, fervently singing patriotic songs with the hopes of a free India.

She feels that India has got independence but people have failed to understand the real meaning of 'azadi'.

"Independence is not as it should have been...there is widespread corruption and back-stabbing. Many times, I think I made a mistake in fighting for the nation and that it was not worth it," an angry Kaushik shot back at IANS.

Freedom fighters looked concerned over the ongoing debate on corruption involving senior ministers and administrative officers and supported the demand for a strong Lokpal bill.

"The scams just reinstate that in our country whoever gets a little power tends to misuse it. Who thought Kalmadi was capable of such blatant corruption? Those who exploited the public money must be sent to jail," said the 88-year-old freedom fighter Shashi Bhushan.

Bhushan emphasises that there has been so much discussion on irregularities in the Commonwealth Games but that no one demands the seizure of the money looted from the exchequer.

"Everyone fought for freedom with great enthusiasm. Today, the development we see is the fruit of that very struggle. The freedom struggle continues against communalism and corruption," says the Padma Bhushan awardee.

Bel Bahadur, 86, was only 18 when he enrolled in the INA's Rangoon training centre.

Reminiscing about those days of the freedom struggle, he says: "A lot of sacrifices have gone into the gaining of our country's independence and this must be always remembered."

Bahadur reflects that over the years, citizens' love for the country and patriotism have declined. "Petty politics is the reason that today no one heeds the nation or serves its needs," he adds.

(Courtesy: IANS)

(Photo courtesy: Apurba B - Photo.net)

 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
A top Chinese Army official on Sunday said negotiations with the Indian Army paved the way for the resolution of the Doklam stand-off on the India-China border.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
As about-turns in the three-year-old BJP government go, this must be among the shortest and most important tweets issued by any BJP leader. And although Prime Minister Modi spent Diwali with soldiers in Gurez less than a week ago, it was left to Home minister Rajnath Singh to announce a major policy shift on Jammu & Kashmir at 4 pm
 
read-more
  In his report at the opening of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, Xi Jinping redefined the principal contradiction facing Chinese society in the new era, namely between unbalanced, inadequate development and the people's ever-growing needs for a better life. Providing this better life has become
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In snap polls in Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party-led coalition has secured a two-thirds majority in the lower house of parliament.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive