FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Time to settle Kashmir
Posted:Aug 16, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
As India and Pakistan celebrate 70 years of Independence, they need to pause and reflect about the suffering of the people of Jammu and Kashmir. The elites who participated in the Cabinet Mission talks of 1946 and those running affairs of the Pakistani and Indian states since 1947 are alone to be blamed for this suffering. Enough has been deliberated upon and discussed in all these years.
 
The specifics of the Cabinet Mission plan, the post-Partition armed insurgency, the then Kashmir ruler’s tilt towards the Indian side and the United Nation Security Council’s resolution No 47 are all out there. But the scale of the human tragedy in Kashmir is so large that we cannot afford the luxury of explicating the nuances of this history.
 
The four-point formula presented for resolution of the Kashmir dispute by General Musharraf’s regime can serve as a starting point. Importantly, the formula had sought an end to militarisation of the region and the sooner that end is achieved the better. By removing territorial claims from its focus the formula’s implementation could facilitate the Kashmiris’ exercise of their right to self-determination, even if not immediately.
 
By endorsing the formula, we’re neither lending support to Musharaf’s dictatorship nor insinuating that dictatorships are better placed than democracies to solve such crucial issus.
 
Quite the contrary, we believe firmly that political and civil society actors that support republican principles of democratic governance in India and Pakistan have stood for and will stand for peaceful resolution of all disputes between the two countries, including the Kashmir dispute whose ultimate fate has to rest with the Kashmiris themselves.
 
It is the solemn responsibility of these actors in the two countries to use the existing forums to advocate an immediate resolution of the issue.
 
Regardless, the governments of India and Pakistan need not waste any more time. A multi-party conference may immediately be called —comprising the governments of Pakistan and India and Kashmiri leadership from both sides of the Line of Control — to proceed towards the end of militarisation in the Valley. That Pakistan has tied the fate of Gilgit-Baltistan to the Kashmir dispute for seven decades now also needs to be addressed. There is a government in place in G-B, elected following the reform package introduced during the Pakistan People’s Party-led government. Those reforms were only the beginning of the process of introducing democratic rule to GB and the culmination of the process remains tied to provision of all fundamental rights and civil liberties enshrined in Pakistani constitution as well as relevant international treaties. Thus, inviting those in power in GB to such a multi-party conference won’t be enough. Voices in the opposition will also have to be consulted.
 
The task is straightforward. Kashmir has had enough of authoritarian control by Indian military and chauvinists on both sides of the 1947 divide have had a say for far too long. Kashmir needs normalcy and establishment of democratic institutions. With such channels available for the redress of internal political problems, those with militant designs will naturally get marginalised and stripped of public appeal.
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Aimed at consolidating cooperation between the armed forces of India and Saudi Arabia and explore new avenues of defence cooperation, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Naval Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba, visited Saudi Arabia on from 4-8 February 2018, writes Anil Bhut
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
Since the NDA government converted the ‘Look East’ Policy to the ‘Act East’ policy, there has been a greater sense of strategic engagement with the ASEAN, writes Gurjit Singh
 
read-more
The UN will be making contacts with Maldives leaders in response to the request by the opposition leaders for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to oversee the all-party talks proposed by that nation's President Abdulla Yameen, Guterres's Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric said Friday.
 
read-more
Bangladesh is disaster prone country because of its conical shape. The risk of climate change, drought, flood and natural disaster has increased uncertainty of agricultural production, which has also increased the level of food insecurity in the country, writes Minhazur Rahman Rezvi
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...

 
Column-image

Book: A Time of Madness; Author: Salman Rashid; Publisher: Aleph; Price: Rs 299; Pages: 127

 
Column-image

Book: Why I Am A Hindu; Author: Shashi Tharoor; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 302; Price: Rs 699