FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Trump calls Indian PM a 'true friend ahead of visit
Posted:Jun 25, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
"Look forward to welcoming India's PM Modi to @WhiteHouse on Monday. Important strategic issues to discuss with a true friend!" US President Donald Trump tweeted Saturday ahead of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s arrival for a three-day official visit. 
 
Talks between Modi and Trump in what would be their first face-to-face meeting would focus on ongoing cooperation, including counter-terrorism and defence partnership in the Indo-Pacific region, besides trade and law enforcement, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer has said.
 
This is Modi’s fifth visit to the US as Prime Minister. While the highlight of his first visit in 2014 was his rock-star like interaction with the Indian diaspora at Madison Square Garden in New York, his second visit saw him interacting with head honchos of top IT companies in California.
 
Modi again visited the US in March last year for the Nuclear Security Summit and followed this up by a bilateral visit at the invitation of then US President Barack Obama. The Prime Minister addressed a joint sitting of the US Congress to much acclaim.
 
However, Monday’s meeting comes under the shadow of Trump’s efforts for stricter norms for issuance of H1-B visas, a key issue for Indian IT companies operating in the US, and Washington pulling out of the Paris climate agreement on which both Modi and Obama worked hard.
 
While Trump said that India and China were trying to gain “billions and billions and billions of dollars” through the climate pact, the whole world condemned Washington’s decision. Modi has said that India would go beyond the Paris agreement as climate protection was part of India’s ethos.
 
As for the H1-B visa issue, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has said that despite all the hue and cry about it, there has been no visible effect in the process.
 
This apart, the issue of what are being seen as racial attacks on Indians in the US will also be something observers will see if comes up for discussion.
 
India-US bilateral trade, which stands somewhere around $115 billion, technology partnerships, defence cooperation and key Indian flagship development programmes are also expected to figure in the talks. It will be interesting to see how “Make in India” of Modi and “Make in America” of Trump will be taken into consideration.
 
On multilateral issues, terrorism will come up for discussion as New Delhi and Washington have been strong partners in the fight against this menace. Pakistan’s role in supporting and financing terrorism in Kashmir and the India-Iran-US trilateral meetings on bringing peace and stability in Afghanistan will be points of major focus.
 
With the current crisis in the Gulf where a number of countries led by Saudi Arabia have cut off diplomatic ties with Qatar for allegedly supporting terrorism, the issue is expected to be discussed in detail. The Gulf is a key partner in India’s energy security with Qatar being the largest supplier of LNG. Also, with the region being home to around eight million expatriate Indians, New Delhi will be keen to know Washington’s position in the current crisis.
 
Given China’s growing influence across different parts of the world, Beijing’s One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative is also expected come up for discussion. India has been opposing the OBOR on the ground that it compromises the territorial integrity of the countries it cover. A case in point is the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a key part of OBOR, that passes through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir.
 
Modi and Trump have spoken to each other thrice over phone since the latter assumed power in January this year. Monday’s first meeting between the two will set the tone for India-US ties in the 21st century.
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Ties between India and Japan are probably at their best ever, Japanese Ambassador to India H.E. Kenji Hiramatsu told India Review & Analysis’ Nilova Roy Chaudhury, as he outlined how the two countries have moved closer. Ahead of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit
 
read-more
The eight members of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) should strengthen cooperation against terrorism and build it into its framework, India's External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj said in New York on September 20.
 
read-more
That regional cooperation in South Asia is lower than optimal levels is well accepted. It is usually ascribed to – the asymmetry in size between India and the rest, conflicts and historical political tensions, a trust deficit, limited transport connectivity, and onerous logistics, among many other factors.
 
read-more
Reflections on September evoke a host of memories.
 
read-more
  During the budget session of the legislative assembly, the Chief Minister informed the  House about state’s missing children. According to her, as many as 162 children have gone missing in the past three years.
 
read-more
The Communist Party of China (CPC) is expected to amend its constitution at the upcoming national congress.
 
read-more
Finally breaking her silence on the Rohingya exodus, Myanmar’s state counsellor and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has said that her government would like to understand the root causes of the refugee crisis and investigate charges of human rights abuses.
 
read-more
The apprehension was justified. US President Donald Trump’s disregard for institutions and fondness for reckless rhetoric meant that his maiden appearance at the annual UN General Assembly was a closely watched affair.
 
read-more
It is a privilege to be invited to this most prestigious of law schools in the country, more so for someone not formally lettered in the discipline of law. I thank the Director and the faculty for this honour.
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Column-image

This is the continuing amazing spiritual journey of a Muslim man from Kerala who plunged into Vedic religion after a chance encounter with a Hindu mystic under a jackfruit tree in the backyard of his house when he was just nine. It is a story w...

 
Column-image

History is told by the victors but in our modern age, even contemporary events get - or are given - a slant, where some contributors soon get eclipsed from the narrative or their images tarnished.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive