FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Two Jongs
Posted:Aug 10, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
A world leader with an unusual hairstyle, a penchant for self-promotion and a deep (self) love for the camera is threatening the “fire and fury” of nuclear war. His Asian rival is his mirror image — a man of unpredictable bravado with a dated haircut and his finger on “the button”. Will diplomacy triumph over their irascible temperaments and save the world?
 
 
Apocalyptic scenarios are no longer just the stuff of Cold War-inspired Hollywood blockbusters. US President Donald Trump, speaking earlier this week, warned North Korea in language that does not befit the leader of a mature country, let alone a superpower. Worse, senior policy advisers have claimed that Trump’s ultimatum was an “off-the-cuff” remark, and “fire and fury” is a phrase the president often uses in private. North Korea — whose leader, Kim Jong Un, was till recently unchallenged in his eccentricities and lack of diplomatic niceties — has not backed down. After saying that dialogue is not possible with Trump because he is “a guy bereft of reason”, North Korea announced a detailed plan to launch Hwasong-12 rockets that will land off the coast of Guam.
 
 
North Korea’s belligerence has increased since UN sanctions were intensified after it tested ballistic missiles earlier this year. A concerted global diplomatic effort is needed to keep its nuclear capabilities in check. That requires a mature US leadership to work with other powers in the region. Trump’s approach seems to be to try and out-shout the rogue communist state, a strategy that doesn’t seem to have been effective in bringing stability and guaranteeing peace. After all, two Jongs don’t make a right.
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
The United Nations General Assembly rallied around world court Judge Dalveer Bhandari of India on Monday in his bid for reelection, defying the Security Council where permanent members and their allies put up a fight to protect one of their own, Britain's Christopher Greenwood.
 
read-more
  It has now been admitted that the shrines in Kashmir are not safe. However, the safety measures put in place by the concerned are not up to the mark. This harsh reality came to fore during Khankah-e-Moula blaze.
 
read-more
Another anti-China report has been issued by the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission. The commission, created by Congress, has in past annual reports proposed extremely negative policies towards China. This year is no exception.
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

In its own coded and diplomatic style, the World Bank has warned that the government’s growth story is now at risk given the scale of the macroeconomic imbalances growing within it.

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.