FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
UN putting peacekeepers at risk, says report
Posted:Jan 22, 2018
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
By Arul Louis
 
The world body has been accused of putting peacekeepers at risk through “lack of will, determination, and accountability” in a scathing report released on Monday that urged them to “not fear to use force when necessary.”
 
The report by a panel that looked into the rising fatalities in UN operations said, “The blue helmet and the United Nations flag no longer offer 'natural' protection”and called for changes to adapt to the new threats.
 
In its most significant recommendation, the report urged a vigorous and proactive approach to the use of force by peacekeepers when they face threats and criticised some leaders and countries for being risk averse.
 
“Unfortunately, hostile forces do not understand a language other than force,” the report said. “To deter and repel attacks and to defeat attackers, the United Nations needs to be strong and not fear to use force when necessary.”
 
Those who are risk averse when it comes to using force “have failed to understand projecting strength is more secure for uniformed and civilian personnel,” it said.
 
The panel appointed last year by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres was headed by retired Brazilian Lieutenant General Carlos Alberto dos Santos Cruz, a veteran of UN operations.
 
The recommendations were accepted by the UN and its Departments of Peacekeeping Operations and Field Support announced a time-bound Action Plan to implement them.
 
The report said that since 2013 the number of casualties of violent incidents have spiked claiming the lives of 195 peacekeepers. Seven of them were Indians killed in South Sudan. This was more than during any five-year period in history since peacekeeping operations were launched in 1948, it noted.
 
In all 161 Indian peacekeepers have been killed in 49 missions.
 
“Fatalities are rising in United Nations peacekeeping operations because the United Nations and the Member States are failing to adapt and take measures needed to operate securely in dangerous environments,” the report said. “This indicates that a lack of will, determination, and accountability among the United Nations and Member States continues to put personnel at risk.”  
 
The adversaries the peacekeepers face, the nature of the conflicts and the conditions they have to operate in have changed very dramatically but UN and troop contributors have not adapted to them, the report said.
 
“Peacekeeping environments now feature armed groups, terrorists, organised crime, street gangs, criminal and political exploitation, and other threats,” the report said.
 
“If the United Nations and T/PCCs (troop and police contributing countries) do not change their mindset, take risks and show a willingness to face these new challenges, they will be consciously sending troops into harm’s way,” the report warned.
 
At the level of framing the mandates and implementing them, the report criticised the “overstretched deployment without a clear objective” spread over large geographic areas.
 
Armed groups are able to mount attacks on the long, slow supply convoys along roads in very bad conditions, it said. Some missions dedicate about of 90 percent of their operational capacity to escorting convoys, it added.
 
The panel criticised the peacekeeping operations' collection and use of intelligence. While they have the high-tech resources to gather intelligence, “they lack the basics, especially human intelligence, networks of informants, situational awareness, and capacity to communicate with the population,” the report said.
 
The report said that troops should not be sent into missions without the necessary equipment. In some missions critical gear like vehicles with protection against mines and specialised weapons and ammunition are lacking it said.
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Aimed at consolidating cooperation between the armed forces of India and Saudi Arabia and explore new avenues of defence cooperation, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Naval Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba, visited Saudi Arabia on from 4-8 February 2018, writes Anil Bhat
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
Representatives from ten Asia Pacific governments, parliaments, civil society organisations (CSOs) and international institutions - including from six South Asian countries - gathered in Bangkok to reflect and share knowledge and learnings on climate change finance and gender-inclusion as part of the Regional Dialogue on Climate Resili
 
read-more
Warning of the changing threat situations around the world, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and his predecessor, Ban Ki-moon, making an unprecedented joint appearance before the Security Council, called on it to focus on prevention of conflicts, staving them off before they arise, writes Arul Louis
 
read-more
Srinivasan leaves his office in Bengaluru where the lights and air-conditioners are switched off when sensors planted inside notice that he is leaving. He is prompted on his e-watch as to how much time it would take for the elevator to arrive on his floor, based on movement-recognition, writes Rajendra Shende
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more

Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre held a lecture in the “2022: The India We Seek”

 
read-more
Column-image

A group of teenagers in a Karachi high school puts on a production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible— and one goes missing. The incident sets off ripples through their already fraught education in lust and witches, and over the years ...

 
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...

 
Column-image

Book: A Time of Madness; Author: Salman Rashid; Publisher: Aleph; Price: Rs 299; Pages: 127