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UN resolution on North Korea represents international will
Posted:Sep 13, 2017
 
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The UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution to impose new sanctions on North Korea Monday. The resolution sets limits on imports of crude oil and oil products to Pyongyang, bans textile and labor service exports from the country and prevents overseas North Korean workers from extending their work contracts. These measures will strike a new blow to economic activities that may support Pyongyang's nuclear and missile development, while trying to avoid harm to the average North Korean citizen. 
 
 
The new resolution has triggered widespread discussion in the West, and some believe China and Russia "softened" a plan drafted earlier by the US. 
 
 
The resolution represents the unified stance and will of the Security Council members and the international community to sanction North Korea at this point. The new sanctions are welcomed by Washington and Seoul, and will be largely pushed forward by Beijing and Moscow. 
 
 
The US first circulated a draft resolution that called for a full oil embargo on North Korea in an attempt to win more leverage. As the new UN resolution has already been passed, raising such a request would be against the will of the international community and destroy international unity on the Pyongyang issue. International unity is of vital importance in managing the current situation. It signals Pyongyang that the country's nuclear ambitions will not extricate itself from a security quagmire. The international community will by no means accept Pyongyang as a nuclear state, and continuing nuclear and missile provocation will only further work to harm the country. 
 
 
Some Americans and South Koreans have attempted to collapse Pyongyang's economy and suffocate the current Pyongyang regime. This is dangerous. North Korea's nuclear crisis requires arduous efforts to find a final solution, and any attempt to immediately end the crisis will only escalate tensions and eventually jeopardize self-interests.
 
 
The UN sanctions have been effective. No country is willing to distance itself from the international community over the long-term, or sacrifice its economic and social development. But at the same time, the international community must show Pyongyang that it will gain more from abandoning its nuclear ambitions than it will from continuing its nuclear tests. The US and South Korea must put in more effort to ease North Korea's security anxieties.
 
 
The international community is unaware that it is just as important for Washington and Seoul to lessen their military threats toward Pyongyang as it is for the latter to abandon its nuclear ambitions.
 
 
Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula is the ultimate goal of the international community. The international community should take practical actions to ease tensions and lessen the risk that things will spin out of control, which is of vital importance at present. 
 
 
Despite their differences, Beijing, Moscow and Washington all oppose Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions and can still communicate on the issue. Beijing, Moscow and Pyongyang all oppose Washington's attempt to maintain a Cold War pattern on the peninsula and its military threats toward North Korea, but the three countries can barely communicate. Major powers should help North Korea with its security and economy, and help it reintegrate into the international community. The peninsula will by no means realize long-term stability if North Korea is excluded from Northeast Asia's economic development.
 
Global Times, September 13, 2017
 
 
 
 
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