FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
We are what we watch
Posted:Sep 22, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Bhutan InfoComm and Media Authority’s (BICMA) initiative to “standardise” and to make the number of television channels uniform throughout the country is appreciable. What is more important, though, is our focus on the contents. Rather the lack of it. Any number of channels anywhere at anytime is by far less significant than the quality of programmes we offer our viewers.
 
BICMA has now approved a total of 56 television channels for distribution in the country. What this means is that the people throughout our country, at least those who don’t use satellite dish, will have access to only these many television channels.  In this sense, perhaps less is good. Besides BBS I and II, what other Bhutanese programmes do we offer our people?
 
A more serious national concern should be about distribution and creation of contents. Encouraging more Bhutanese programmes is critically important today what with our mandate to promote Dzongkha as our national language and the special emphasis we give to promotion of our national identity.
 
Coming down to the facts, we have today our children speaking almost flawless Hindi than Dzongkha even as Dzongkha is one of the main languages of instruction in school through to college. We ought to ask why this is so. Our children are exposed to more foreign contents than Bhutanese. Our children are also more familiar with contents that are pitiably poor in taste.
 
And then we talk about promotion of our national language.
 
Research shows that if a society is fed with high quality programmes, demand develops for even better quality programmes. Sir David Attenborough’s natural science programmes have educated half the world’s population for decades. Even children love the programmes, because they are not just educative but also highly entertaining. There is a lesson here. Perhaps we missed it because we didn’t want to see it.
 
Investment. Let’s talk about it. There is a serious need to invest in creation of local programmes that are not just educative. Programmes have to be entertaining too. This whole affair will be expensive, of course. But the benefit far outweighs the cost, because we are talking also about the soul of the nation.
 
If the state cannot invest in content creation, so many years after television was legalised in the country, maybe private participation should be encouraged. Healthy competition is necessary. Media growth means growth in education.
 
We look at BICMA’s this initiative as the first real step towards bringing in real change. More surveys must follow. What is so fundamentally important is that development of high quality local contents has to be at the core of the focus.
 
Kuensel Online, September 23, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
  Nearly 58 per cent of the about 600,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are children who suffer from severe malnutrition, a UN report released said.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
read-more
According to the National Bureau of Statistics, China's GDP expanded 6.9 percent year on year in the first three quarters of 2017, an increase of 0.2 percent above that of the corresponding period of last year.
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive