FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Welcome policy shift
Posted:Sep 18, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
During his three-nation tour to discuss US President Donald Trump’s new Afghan policy, Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif had accepted the failure to his government’s security policies in countering banned terrorist outfits. The FM’s statement was seen as a public admission of the need to revisit the security policy with clarity on the issue of extremist groups that pose an existential challenge to the country. Analysts hoped that an across the board and comprehensive action against these groups could be initiated.
 
But in came former interior minister Chaudhry Nisar — whose apologist narrative on extremism during his time as interior minister reminds us of everything that is wrong with Pakistan’s policy on religious extremism. Nisar recently issued a statement criticising FM Khawaja Asif’s remarks on banned organisations operating in Pakistan. He was quoted as saying that comments on ‘sensitive issues’ must be based on facts.
 
Extremist groups have posed a serious threat to the stability and security of the country, but still the apologist narrative characterised by the like of the former interior minister persists unchecked. Nisar’s soft corner for banned sectarian outfits is well known as during his ministership he had held meetings with their heads on several occasions. The former minister even had the audacity to justify his outlooktowards these groups on the floor of the House when asked to explain his position by the opposition MPs. He apparently found banned sectarian outfits as different from terrorist groups and advocated that the two should not be equated.
 
With Nisar no longer in charge of the country’s internal security, the current government’s approach in dealing with the menace of terrorism seems to be undergoing considerable shift. But if the ruling party is to truly reform its image and policies, it should distance itself from Nisar’s controversial statements. The ruling party ought to take a clear position on the issue of extremism especially since it is now playing the civilian supremacy card to win the support of democrats in the wake of Nawaz Sharif’s disqualification. This requires it to clearly dissociate itself from Nisar’s apologist narrative as well as to ensure that this clarity-of-purpose is reflected in its actions against extremists of all stripes. 
 
Daily Times, September 19, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
  Nearly 58 per cent of the about 600,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are children who suffer from severe malnutrition, a UN report released said.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
read-more
According to the National Bureau of Statistics, China's GDP expanded 6.9 percent year on year in the first three quarters of 2017, an increase of 0.2 percent above that of the corresponding period of last year.
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive