FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Yoga gives people control of their lives, contributing to better health: UN forum
Posted:Jun 21, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
By Arul Louis
 
Yoga empowers people to take control of their lives and achieve better health at lower cost to society, according to experts at a forum at the United Nations on Wednesday celebrating the Third International Day of Yoga (IDY).
 
Bruce Lipton, a developmental biologist, said that the emerging field of epigenetics shows that “we are not determined by (our) genes” and can be “powerful masters” of one's own life. Yoga, he said, can help people overcome their genetic inheritance and change their health outcomes.
 
This year's IDY theme was “Yoga for Health” and the science, health, business and yoga experts on the panel at the UN spoke of how its proliferation can lead the way to better health for all with a reduction in healthcare costs and achieve the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.
 
The World Health Organisation (WHO), which co-sponsored the event, is in the middle of a year-long campaign, “Let's talk about depression,” which takes aim at this specific mental health problem. Nata Menabde, the Executive Director of WHO UN Office, said yoga combats depression and has a role in the campaign.
 
WHO was collaborating with leading academic institutions around the world, including some in the Ivy League, on scientific research on the health effects of yoga, she said.
 
Yoga can reduce medical expenses through preventing diseases, she added.
 
Swami Chidanand Saraswati of the Paramarta Niketan Ashram in Rishikesh said healthcare should move from medicine to meditation because of its power to heal. In hospitals, he said, meditation should be used alongside medication, as society moves from healthcare to “yogacare.” This would lead to tremendous savings in healthcare costs, he added.
 
Keith Mitchell, a former United States National Football League star who suffered a career-ending spinal injury during a game that virtually paralysed him, gave powerful testimony about the healing power of yoga. Starting with breathing exercises and then through other yoga exercises, he was able to walk again, he said.
 
Lack of connection to family and society lies at the root of illnesses and yoga can help overcome this through bringing about a connection to family and society, said Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, also of the Paramarta Niketan Ashram.
 
Citing the cases of amputees continuing to feel pain in their phantom limbs -- the parts that have been removed -- she said that experience of physical pain is in the mind and yoga, through its effects on the mind, can help control pain.
 
Another testimony to the power of yoga in a different area came from Stanton Kawer, the CEO of a US marketing company. He said that what he learned through yoga helped his business when applied to the work environment.
 
Workers' engagement with their work and company ultimately boosts the success of the company and this could be achieved through yoga, he said. Bringing the yoga principles of honouring and respecting people to the workplace makes a difference and this has worked for his company he said.
 
Bollywood actor-activist Anupam Kher said that often one's happiness is left in the hands of others, but yoga's impact is enabling one to be oneself and finding happiness within.
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
A top Chinese Army official on Sunday said negotiations with the Indian Army paved the way for the resolution of the Doklam stand-off on the India-China border.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
As about-turns in the three-year-old BJP government go, this must be among the shortest and most important tweets issued by any BJP leader. And although Prime Minister Modi spent Diwali with soldiers in Gurez less than a week ago, it was left to Home minister Rajnath Singh to announce a major policy shift on Jammu & Kashmir at 4 pm
 
read-more
  In his report at the opening of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, Xi Jinping redefined the principal contradiction facing Chinese society in the new era, namely between unbalanced, inadequate development and the people's ever-growing needs for a better life. Providing this better life has become
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In snap polls in Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party-led coalition has secured a two-thirds majority in the lower house of parliament.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive