Books

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India faces existential threat from within: Shivshankar Menon

National Security is often a topic that has remained confined to the realm of international relations. There has perhaps been very little effort made in the Indian context to analyse the traditional and non-traditional threats facing the country. In such a scenario characterised by dearth of information, the launch of "The Oxford Handbook of India’s National Security" edited by eminent scholars and academicians, Sumit Ganguly, Nicolas Blarel and Manjeet S Pardesi, in New Delhi paved the way for a debate that reexamined the very concept of national security.

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Whither National Security Strategy? (Book Review)

The book, written in the manner of a series of case studies, also points to the lack of a clearly enunciated national security strategy, a defence situational review, a defence strategy and a joint strategy for the armed forces -- all of this hampering military reforms.

 

Pakistan at the Crossroads (Book Review)

The book ‘Pakistan at crossroads: Domestic Dynamics and External Pressures’  is one of the few books in recent years which fixes spotlight on various aspects of Pakistan; the internal flummoxing situation and external forces which are at work, keeping  the pot of conflict boiling. This book entails essays drawn from two conferences that were organized at Columbia University, writes Ahmad Zaboor for South Asia Monitor.

Capital Market Integration in South Asia; Realizing the SAARC Opportunity: Book Review

In a region which is unexplored as an asset class, performance will be the kingmaker. This book includes the author’s CDCF Portfolio basket for the SAARC asset class, which selects the best fundamental-performers on a rolling basis. While this may not give equal representation to all countries, it selects the best performers, writes Sourajit Aiyer for South Asia Monitor.

Sri Lanka: A beautiful but blood-soaked country (Book Review)

Sri Lanka has to be the most beautiful country I have ever seen, says John Gimlette, an accomplished travel writer who journeys to the island nation at the end of a long and brutal civil war. Anyone who has seen the country will more than agree. Marco Polo too felt it was the world's prettiest island. And an Englishman wrote in 1803 that Sri Lanka deserves the name Paradise. But as John discovered, there was as much blood as there was beauty.

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India-China civil-society dialogue on climate change, sustainable development

China has initiated early actions on the Wuhan summit between Indian PM Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping that stressed the need for people-to-people dialogue for the development of not only India and China but the whole world.

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India’s growth story is treading on thin ice

By all estimates, the Indian economy has entered a phase of recovery. After a period of subdued growth that was marred by a spate of disruptions, India has regained the fastest-growing major eco...

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