Spotlight

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India's hyper-nationalist narratives helped Pakistan Army stay relevant

The warmongering narrative, primarily driven by the ruling party and the media at large, may fetch some electoral gains to the BJP  but it has proved to be welcome fodder for the Army in Pakistan as it tries to reinvent itself to remain relevant, writes Mayank Mishra for South Asia Monitor

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Can India really talk to a duplicitous Pakistan?

Pakistan’s offer of the Kartarpur corridor, closely following a series of events, spread not only over the Kashmir Valley, but Punjab and the Northeast, again exposes that country's duplicity, writes Anil Bhat for South Asia Monitor.  

INS Arihant and India's nuclear triad: Lessons to be learnt

Apart from its strategic significance, the Arihant is a live example of how Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ vision could have been actualized. The Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) programme, under which it was built, mobilized a large number of major and minor private-sector companies (including MSMEs), which contributed to the programme by mastering esoteric technologies, to design and fabricate systems for this vessel, writes Admiral Arun Prakash (retd.) for South Asia Monitor

Whither UP? Where prejudice and polarisation trumps governance

If governance was about policies and decisions for public justice and welfare, the BJP showed through its chief administrator in the country's most electorally consequential state that law and order could be cynically subordinated to political expediency. And so what if Uttar Pradesh was at the bottom of the pile in the Human Development Index, writes Tarun Basu for South Asia Monitor  

Afghan girls battle for education: A conflict-hit government fails its obligations

Even 14 years after the Taliban regime collapsed there were no big changes in girls' education in the country and a report showed that in 2015 an estimated 3.5 million children were out of school in Afghanistan and 85 per cent of them were girls, writes Zarifa Sabet for South Asia Monitor 

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