India: The world war stories

The Chief of Smoke, a true jagirdar of the World Wars

It was a hot and humid morning in July 1979 in village Bahadurpur of Meerut district. Subedar Major (SM) Hukam Chand was ready to undertake a journey for the one last time writes Commander Arun Jyoti

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India, Respect the Soldier

If you ever wanted an example of how high education - Western education, that highly valued, albeit inflated, commodity in India - does not bring wisdom, one just has to read architect Gautam Bhatia's downright disparaging and insensitive article on the National War Memorial in a leading newspaper early this week, titled: 'Don't battle over new war memorial; settle for old.'

Why World War II was an India story too

Many Indians today argue why we shouldn't remember the Second World War. They say it was not our war, so we shouldn't be bothered. They say that the 2.5 million Indians who fought in it were "slaves" of the British Empire who got what they deserved — oblivion. Yet what did this war mean to us?

Japanese ate Indian PoWs, used them as live targets in WWII

NEW DELHI: On April 2, 1946, the Reuters correspondent in Melbourne, Australia, cabled a short message, which was carried by all newspapers a day later, including The Times of India. It read: "The Japanese Lieutenant Hisata Tomiyasu found guilty of the murder of 14 Indian soldiers and of cannibalism at Wewak (New Guinea) in 1944 has been sentenced to death by hanging, it is learned from Rabaul."

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Three new projects in U.S.-India State and Urban Initiative

The U.S.-India State and Urban Initiative, led by the CSIS Wadhwani Chair in U.S.-India Policy Studies and the CSIS Energy and National Security Program, has announced three new projects with the state government of Maharashtra

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India's agriculture crisis: Can Modi government address stagnating farm incomes?

India may be the world’s fastest growing large economy but the growth process has not been inclusive enough to lift the incomes of its 119-odd million farmers.

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