Sri Lanka

A note for posterity

Feb 13, 2017
The UN report published on Friday January 28 describing a ‘culture of torture’ in this county has been described as a wake up call. But it’s doubtful if it’s going to wake anyone up. The report by special rapporteur Juan Mendez said there were credible reports to show that the notorious ‘white van abductions’ carried out routinely under the previous regime had continued under the new government between 2015-16.
 
The government will of course deny this. As the Yahapalanaya government began exhuming bodies, carrying out DNA tests and arresting suspects for murdering and disappearing people during the Rajapaksa years, we believed that the country’s judicial system and human rights record was about to transform itself. Now we know this isn’t true.   
The new regime has not solved a single case. When High Court Judge Sarath Ambepitiya was murdered by a drug lord, the trial was concluded within a matter of months. But the trials of murdered journalists, a rugby player and several Tamil students are dragging on and some of the suspects have even got back their military ranks. Apart from these highly publicized cases, there are many more ‘lesser folk’ whose disappearances have not got any hearing at all.   
This writer expected the ‘white van’ phenomenon to be a high priority agenda for the Sirisena-Wickremesinghe government elected to power with a promise of a clean slate on many accounts. But no one bothered. There was no committee appointed to look into it. A leading Sinhala newspaper carried a story (with a photograph) when several soldiers and a lieutenant in civvies were caught in a ‘citizens’ arrest’ at Kolonnawa while trying to abduct a local politician during the previous regime.
 
Read more at: http://www.dailymirror.lk/article/A-note-for-posterity-123692.html#sthash.8HRDuJ32.dpuf
 

Daily Mirror, February 13, 2017

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