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Trump nominates Juster as ambassador to India

United States President Donald Trump has nominated Kenneth Juster, an architect of closer India-US relations who helped lay the foundations of the India-US nuclear cooperation agreement, to be the ambassador to New Delhi.

Sep 2, 2017
United States President Donald Trump has nominated Kenneth Juster, an architect of closer India-US relations who helped lay the foundations of the India-US nuclear cooperation agreement, to be the ambassador to New Delhi.
The nomination announced by the White House on Friday evening will have to be approved by the Senate.
His nomination is a mark of the importance Trump places on building closer economic, trade and strategic relations with India because of Juster's recent position in the Trump administration and his past role in charting ties with New Delhi.
Juster, 62, had an influential role in helping develop policy in international trade, an area that Trump had made into one of the corner stones of his campaign, as the president's Deputy Assistant for International Economic Affairs and the Deputy Director of the National Economic Council. He was simultaneously a senior staff member of the National Security Council.
Just prior to leaving those positions in June amid speculation about the ambassadorship to India, he was Trump's representative for the advance work and negotiations for the May summit of the industrialised democracies, known as the G7, in Italy.
The New Delhi position has been vacant since January when Richard Verma resigned along with most political appointees of President Barack Obama's administration.
The nomination of the new envoy follows Trump's announcement in his Afghanistan strategy speech last week  that “another critical part of the South Asia strategy for America is to further develop its strategic partnership with India.” He simultaneously delivered Pakistan the sternest warning by a US leader saying that it has “much to lose” by continuing to harbour terrorists.
As the Under Secretary for Commerce in the George W. Bush administration, Juster played at key role in developing India-US relations the high point of which was the civilian nuclear cooperation agreement.
While in that position, he founded and chaired the U.S.-India High Technology Cooperation Group, and played an important role in developing the Next Steps in Strategic Partnership (NSSP) initiative between the two countries.The NSSP laid the foundation for increased civilian nuclear and space cooperation, and high-technology trade and expanded dialogue on missile defense.
For these contributions to boosting ties to India, the US-India Business Council honoured him in 2004 with the Blackwill Award.
Between leaving the Bush administration in 2005 and joining the Trump administration, Juster served as the executive vice president of the technology company Salesforce.com and managing director at the global investment firm Walter Pincus.
 

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