Vaccine acceptance high among Indian women

As India has started rolling out the next phase of its COVID-19 vaccination drive for people above 60 years of age and those over 45 years with comorbidities, a new survey by Harvard researchers has found that vaccine acceptance among women in India is among the highest in the world

Mar 02, 2021
Image
A

As India has started rolling out the next phase of its COVID-19 vaccination drive for people above 60 years of age and those over 45 years with comorbidities, a new survey by Harvard researchers has found that vaccine acceptance among women in India is among the highest in the world.

Almost 18,000 women in 16 countries responded to questions about a hypothetical safe and free COVID-19 vaccine with 90 per cent efficacy, according to the survey conducted by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Overall, 52 per cent of pregnant women and 73 per cent of non-pregnant women said they would receive such a vaccine, and 69 per cent of all women surveyed said they would vaccinate their children, showed the results published in the European Journal of Epidemiology.

Acceptance in India, the Philippines, and Latin American countries was above 60 per cent among pregnant women and above 78 per cent among non-pregnant women for themselves; more than 75 per cent of mothers indicated they would vaccinate their children.

Vaccine acceptance in the US and Russia was lower - below 45 per cent among pregnant women and below 56 per cent among non-pregnant women for themselves and similar to countries with very few COVID-19 cases, such as Australia and New Zealand.

This phenomenon in the US and Russia could be due to COVID-19 denial, according to the researchers.

"Our study confirmed that COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy is multifaceted," said Harvard Chan School's Julia Wu, who is senior author of the paper.

"The perceived threat of COVID-19, level of trust in public health agencies, and existing pre-Covid 19 vaccine attitudes play key roles shaping vaccine acceptance and confidence. Vaccination campaigns should be tailored to alleviate these specific concerns."

(IANS)

DMM Thank you

SPS-NBN

News Behind the News Special Studies

Tweets about SAMonitor
SAM Facebook

Newsletter Subscription

The subscriber's email address.
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.